marc

I recently returned from the HR Summit in Bangalore, India where I gave the opening keynote address around the topic of Learning and Development Strategies for Human Resources Effectiveness. There were more than 450 delegates in attendance and they all had one thing in common – they were looking to advance the standing of their profession and the opportunities of their organisations.

marc

I was recently invited to write an article about developing effective assessments. In fact, I was asked to discuss how to ‘develop assessment tools that even an auditor would be proud of’. Now, it is great that an auditor loves your work, but ultimately the true test of a successful assessment tool is whether it is a good fit for the benchmark standards, the candidate/s and the workplace the competency is to be applied. Moreover, just because it looks good and ticks all the auditor’s boxes, this doesn’t necessarily make it right for all occasions.

marc

On the final day of our recent Learning Leaders Summit, we had a debate which posed the question is success as a Learning Leader about attitude or technique.

marc

Yes and No. In a sense the traditional concept of “teacher” is one which has diminishing impact. The notion of what a teacher is and does is changing and being increasingly replaced and extended by the role of guide and mentor. More than “redundant”, teachers are at risk of becoming irrelevant. No longer are teachers the bastions of knowledge and harbingers of a single, right way of doing things. Moreover, learners are not looking for that structured, linear style of learning either. In a Post-Google world, learners are wired to use networks and search engines to find answers quickly.

marc
One of the most common challenges for trainers is getting the group to refocus and return to their seats after an activity, particularly when this activity has been noisy or ends in bursts of laughter.  Similarly, a lot of time can be lost to the trainer when their group does not return in a timely fashion after a break.  A few months ago we went to our brains trust of training colleagues and former students with the simple question: How do you get your participants back on time? Below is a summary of the best tips we collected: 1. Tune them in!
marc
Perhaps I have been watching too much late night television, but recently I have come to the conclusion that there are a lot of things that trainers can learn from stand- up comedians. As a result, I have compiled a list of advice that I think crosses over well: 1.Know your audience.
marc
Last week I attended the ASTD International Conference in Orlando, Florida and was lucky enough to catch the last public presentation from Donald Kirkpatrick. He is someone who has had such a profound effect on our industry and I thought his contribution was worth reflecting on this month.
marc

Whist I normally write about the challenges facing practitioners in the vocational education space, I thought it wise to review the student experience before they reach us and the baggage they may bring from their school experience. I think there are implications for us, if we have a disaffected group graduating into our learning environments and feel the timing is right to discuss some of these issues here. I continue to be troubled by our school system that is high on pursuit of excellence rhetoric, but has internal systems which actively work against teachers who perform exceptionally.

marc

I continue to be amazed at how little preparation seems to go into presentations. Outside of our training and assessment space, I do get an opportunity to see a range of presentations via conferences and workshops and whilst the presenters tend to have good subject matter knowledge they seem to lack an ability to plan for an effective transfer of this. Therefore, I thought it was timely to share my seven easy steps for success when session planning.

marc

As I sit silently in a self-made lock down to complete my latest book about training games, I thought I would take a break and consider the wider process of becoming published.

More and more, educational institutions are asking for staff to contribute to their professional development through scholarly activities such as conducting research, presenting papers at conferences or having articles accepted for publication. The question we get a lot from our students is “how do we get ourselves published, the first time?”

Here are some hints:

Pages


Fatal error: view::destroy(): The script tried to execute a method or access a property of an incomplete object. Please ensure that the class definition "views_plugin_display_system" of the object you are trying to operate on was loaded _before_ unserialize() gets called or provide an autoloader to load the class definition in /home/customer/www/marcratcliffe.com.au/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/includes/view.inc on line 2043