marc
Perhaps I have been watching too much late night television, but recently I have come to the conclusion that there are a lot of things that trainers can learn from stand- up comedians. As a result, I have compiled a list of advice that I think crosses over well: 1.Know your audience.
marc

I continue to be amazed at how little preparation seems to go into presentations. Outside of our training and assessment space, I do get an opportunity to see a range of presentations via conferences and workshops and whilst the presenters tend to have good subject matter knowledge they seem to lack an ability to plan for an effective transfer of this. Therefore, I thought it was timely to share my seven easy steps for success when session planning.

marc

Even experienced trainers with the latest resources and most interesting training material can be thrown off course by the behaviours of difficult participants. Therefore, it is important to load the kit bag with a variety of tools and techniques to overcome the dilemmas presented by some students.

marc
Most participants' brains seem to stop functioning when you invite them to ask questions. It’s like at the mere mention of the phrase “are there any questions” a chain-reaction of nuclear proportions engulfs the participants’ brains and they all become suddenly quiet as the fallout spreads through their bodies and renders them incapable of even making eye contact! Possible causes:
marc

Recently I was approached by Teacher Magazine to write an article around how to motivate teachers during Professional Development and Training. The full article “All Aboard: Reluctant passengers on the training journey” will appear in their March edition. Below are some thoughts on the topic:

marc
Often trainers move around their space without much thought of where to move and why. Rather than this restless wandering, we should wander with purpose. We should be somewhere because we choose it, not because we want to fill the space. We should move somewhere because it adds to the message, not because we don’t know where to stand. Position and poise should be used to build impact. It is part of our non-verbal arsenal which complements the vocals and helps to attract and maintain the attention of the group.  Some things to consider…
marc
I was asked to say a few words at a closing ceremony of a training course recently and in my speech I provided some tips for giving successful presentations. I talked about the “Butterfly Effect”, (not to be confused with that film with Ashton Kutcher), where people get nervous in front of the group. In delivering the speech, I was reminded about a quote I once heard about not letting the butterflies in your stomach worry you. Rather, you just have to “get them flying in formation”!